[Corpora-List] Corpora Digest, Vol 81, Issue 14

Krishnamurthy, Ramesh r.krishnamurthy at aston.ac.uk
Sun Mar 9 14:08:08 CET 2014


IS THIS AN ERROR? ALL OF THE POSTS BELOW ARE FROM FRIDAY 7th MARCH. TODAY IS SUNDAY 9th MARCH???? ________________________________________ From: corpora-bounces at uib.no [corpora-bounces at uib.no] on behalf of corpora-request at uib.no [corpora-request at uib.no] Sent: 09 March 2014 11:00 To: corpora at uib.no Subject: Corpora Digest, Vol 81, Issue 14

Today's Topics:

1. Re: Corpora/recordings with deceptive text/language or lies

in discourse (forensic or other)? (Kevin B. Cohen)

2. Summary - Thanks for the replies! -> Gold standard for

document similarity (Ivelina Nikolova)

3. Job at ELDA: Senior Technical Engineer / Scientist (Software

team Manager) (ELRA ELDA Information)

4. 3rd CfP: ACL workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics (deadline

March 21) (Oren Tsur)

5. (deadline: March 21) 3rd CfP: ACL workshop on NLP and Social

Dynamics (Oren Tsur)

6. CoNLL 2014 Last Call for Papers (Roser Morante)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1 Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2014 05:50:07 -0700 From: "Kevin B. Cohen" <kevin.cohen at gmail.com> Subject: Re: [Corpora-List] Corpora/recordings with deceptive

text/language or lies in discourse (forensic or other)? To: Damir Cavar <dcavar at me.com> Cc: Corpora List <corpora at uib.no>

For a good overview of linguistic and other cues to deception, I recommend Roger Shuy's "The language of confession, interrogation, and deception." It's a fascinating book. I use examples from it in teaching all the time--in these days of CSI and the like, students perk up when you talk about forensic linguistics.

Kev

On Thu, Mar 6, 2014 at 2:46 PM, Damir Cavar <dcavar at me.com> wrote:


> Hi everybody,
>
> I am looking for corpora with dialog/discourse transcribed and annotated
> wrt. deception or lies in various languages, and relevant recent work on
> linguistic cues (speech and language) in deceptive language. Where could
> one find such material? Maybe some police interview archives? Any idea?
>
> (I know, some of you will say, don't look far, just open up the daily
> newspaper or watch some TV... but, you know, what I mean... :-) )
>
> Thanks a lot!
>
> Damir
>
> --
> Please support the LINGUIST List with a donation - Fund Drive 2014:
> http://linguistlist.org/fund-drive/2014/
>
> Damir Cavar
> Director of the Institute for Language Information and Technology
> Moderator of The LINGUIST List
> Eastern Michigan University
> http://linguistlist.org/people/damir_cavar.html
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> UNSUBSCRIBE from this page: http://mailman.uib.no/options/corpora
> Corpora mailing list
> Corpora at uib.no
> http://mailman.uib.no/listinfo/corpora
>
>

-- Kevin Bretonnel Cohen, PhD Biomedical Text Mining Group Lead, Computational Bioscience Program, U. Colorado School of Medicine 303-916-2417 http://compbio.ucdenver.edu/Hunter_lab/Cohen -------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: text/html Size: 2529 bytes Desc: not available URL: <https://mailman.uib.no/public/corpora/attachments/20140307/daf34792/attachment.txt>

------------------------------

Message: 2 Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2014 15:52:56 +0200 From: Ivelina Nikolova <iva at lml.bas.bg> Subject: [Corpora-List] Summary - Thanks for the replies! -> Gold

standard for document similarity To: "corpora at uib.no" <corpora at uib.no>

Thanks to everyone who replied to my post! I've compiled a summary of the answers which you can see below.

General comment: Comparatively few similarity datasets above the sentence level exist.

Resources:

1. Lee & Pincombe's dataset: Michael D. Lee, Brandon Pincombe, and Matthew Welsh. 2005. An empirical evaluation of models of text document similarity. In Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pages 1254--1259, Mahwah, NJ. Erlbaum.

These are human graded similarities between paragraph sized texts. Need to contact Michael Lee to get access to it. Contact: Michael D. Lee <mdlee at uci.edu>

2. Linda Bawcom's observations: 1) much of the similarity is caused by so many newspapers using the same agency (mostly Reuters and Associated Press -in the United States) to get their news and 2) she used a free online similarity program (really one that is normally used for plagiarism) to find that similarity: http://plagiarism.bloomfieldmedia.com/z-wordpress/2012/03/05/new-release-wcopyfind-4-1-1/. She prepared ? corpus on TSUNAMI-related topics

Contact: Linda Bawcom <linda.bawcom at sbcglobal.net>

3. SemEval Text Similarity task 2013

http://ixa2.si.ehu.es/sts/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=47&Itemid=54

- Core task - Given two sentences, s1 and s2, participants will quantifiably inform us on how similar s1 and s2 are, resulting in a similarity score. - Pilot task on typed-similarity between semi-structured records. The types of similarity to be studied include location, author, people involved, time, events or actions, subject, description. Data is available here: http://ixa2.si.ehu.es/sts/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=49&Itemid=56

Contact: "Zesch, Torsten, Dr." <torsten.zesch at uni-due.de>

4. 20 newsgroups

http://qwone.com/~jason/20Newsgroups/

The 20 Newsgroups data set is a collection of approximately 20,000 newsgroup documents, partitioned (nearly) evenly across 20 different newsgroups. To the best of my knowledge, it was originally collected by Ken Lang, probably for his Newsweeder: Learning to filter netnews paper, though he does not explicitly mention this collection. The 20 newsgroups collection has become a popular data set for experiments in text applications of machine learning techniques, such as text classification and text clustering.

5. Reuters corpus http://about.reuters.com/researchandstandards/corpus/statistics/index.asp

6. Adam Kilgarriff & Tony Russell-Rose wrote a paper evaluating various metrics for comparing corpora, and as part of that process created a set of 'known similarity corpora' which included various newspaper sources. It's documented here: Measures for corpus similarity and homogeneity http://aclweb.org/anthology//W/W98/W98-1506.pdf The documents are here: ftp://ftp.itri.brighton.ac.uk/KSC The METER Corpus is here: http://nlp.shef.ac.uk/meter/

Contacts: Tony Russell-Rose <tgr at russellrose.com>, Paul D Clough <p.d.clough at sheffield.ac.uk>

7. JRC resources - JEX corpus, which accompanies the JEC software (http://ipsc.jrc.ec.europa.eu/index.php?id=60) - The news clusters downloaded and annotated for multi-document summarisation (see at the bottom of the page http://ipsc.jrc.ec.europa.eu/?id=61). - NewsExplorer news clusters (e.g. http://emm.newsexplorer.eu/NewsExplorer/home/en/latest.html).

Contacts: Ralf Steinberger <ralf.steinberger at jrc.ec.europa.eu>

8. Recent publications on the topic Daniel Baer's PhD Thesis: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/3641/1/Thesis_Screen.pdf

--Ivelina

-- Ivelina Nikolova PhD student in Computer Science Linguistic Modelling Department Institute of Information and Communication Technologies Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

On 03/05/2014 04:23 PM, Paul D Clough wrote:
> Hi, for research purposes there is the METER Corpus:
> http://nlp.shef.ac.uk/meter/. Let me know if you want a copy. I helped
> create the corpus to assess methods for detecting text reuse.
>
> Paul.
>
>
>
> On 5 March 2014 10:13, Tony Russell-Rose <tgr at russellrose.com
> <mailto:tgr at russellrose.com>> wrote:
>
> A few years ago Adam Kilgarriff & I wrote a paper evaluating
> various metrics for comparing corpora, and as part of that process
> created a set of 'known similarity corpora' which included various
> newspaper sources. It's documented here:
>
> http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.32.1716
>
> Not sure we still have the data but it shouldn't be too difficult
> to recreate (feel free to contact me offline)
>
> HTH,
> Tony
> --
> -------------------------------
> Tony Russell-Rose PhD FBCS CITP
> Vice-chair, BCS IRSG
> Chair, IEHF HCI Group
> http://uxlabs.co.uk
> http://isquared.wordpress.com
>
> On 04/03/2014 15:48, Ivelina Nikolova wrote:
>> Dear corpora members,
>>
>> I am looking for a gold standard to train/evaluate document
>> similarity metrics.
>> Can anyone suggest a suitable corpus for such purposes. I'm
>> especially interested in similarity between newspaper articles.
>>
>> Thanks in advance,
>> Ivelina
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> UNSUBSCRIBE from this page: http://mailman.uib.no/options/corpora
> Corpora mailing list
> Corpora at uib.no <mailto:Corpora at uib.no>
> http://mailman.uib.no/listinfo/corpora
>
>
>
>
> --
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Dr. Paul Clough
> Reader in Information Retrieval
>
> Information School
> University of Sheffield
> Regent Court
> Sheffield S1 4DP
> Tel: +44 (0)114 2222664
> Fax: +44 (0)114 2780300
> Email: p.d.clough at sheffield.ac.uk <mailto:p.d.clough at sheffield.ac.uk>
> Web: http://ir.shef.ac.uk/cloughie/
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> UNSUBSCRIBE from this page: http://mailman.uib.no/options/corpora
> Corpora mailing list
> Corpora at uib.no
> http://mailman.uib.no/listinfo/corpora

-------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: text/html Size: 11974 bytes Desc: not available URL: <https://mailman.uib.no/public/corpora/attachments/20140307/2fb241b7/attachment.txt>

------------------------------

Message: 3 Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2014 15:35:44 +0100 From: ELRA ELDA Information <info at elda.org> Subject: [Corpora-List] Job at ELDA: Senior Technical Engineer /

Scientist (Software team Manager) To: undisclosed-recipients:;

[Apologies for multiple postings]

The European Language resources Distribution Agency (ELDA), a company specialized in Human Language Technologies within an international context, acting as the distribution agency of the European Language Resources Association (ELRA), is currently seeking to fill an immediate vacancy for *Senior Technical Engineer/Scientist (Software team Manager)* position.

Under the supervision of the CEO, the responsibilities of the Senior Technical Engineer/Scientist include managing of a small development team, designing/specifying tools and software components for Language Resources, production frameworks and platforms, carrying out quality control and assessment. He/she will be in charge of renovating the current language resources production workflows. This yields excellent opportunities for young, creative, and motivated candidates wishing to participate actively to the Language Engineering field. He/she will be in charge of conducting the activities related to language resources and Natural Language Processing technologies. The task will mostly consist in managing language resources production projects and co-ordinating ELDA's participation in R&D projects while being also hands-on whenever required by the development team.

Profile :

Good knowledge of Linux and open source software

Proficiency in Python, Django, PhP, Perl, CSS

Proficiency in Django-CMS is a plus

Good knowledge of e-commerce development (Python/Django-oriented)

Proficiency in French and English

Dynamic and communicative, flexible to combine and work on different tasks

Experience with technology transfer projects, industrial projects,collaborative projects within the European Commission or other international frameworks

Good knowledge of the Language Technology area is a plus

Ability to work independently and as part of a team, in particular the ability to supervise members of a multidisciplinary team

Citizenship of (or residency papers) a European Union country

Applications will be considered until the position is filled. The position is based in Paris.

Salary : Commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Applicants should email a cover letter addressing the points listed above together with a curriculum vitae to :

Khalid Choukri ELRA / ELDA 9, rue des Cordličres 75013 Paris FRANCE Fax : 01 43 13 33 30 Mail : job at elda.org

Please check out our other vacant positions:

* Project Manager in Speech and Multimodal

<http://www.elda.org/article289.html>

* Junior Technical Engineer / Scientist (Project Manager)

<http://www.elda.org/article292.html>

-------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: text/html Size: 5674 bytes Desc: not available URL: <https://mailman.uib.no/public/corpora/attachments/20140307/b1a15c0d/attachment.txt>

------------------------------

Message: 4 Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2014 09:56:16 -0500 From: Oren Tsur <oren.tsur at gmail.com> Subject: [Corpora-List] 3rd CfP: ACL workshop on NLP and Social

Dynamics (deadline March 21) To: corpora at uib.no

====================================================================

====================================================================

3rd CfP: ACL workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics

Apologies for multiple postings

Please distribute to colleagues

=================================================================

3rd Call for Papers

1st workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics, collocated with ACL 2014, Baltimore, USA WS date: June 27, 2014 *Submission deadline: March 21, 2014*

Details: https://sites.google.com/site/orentsur/acl-workshop-on-nlp-and-social-dynamics

Confirmed panelists: Hanna Wallach (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Jacob Eisenstein (Georgia Tech), and Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil ( Max Plank Institute SWS)

=================================================================

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:

Language is a set of publicly agreed conventions that serves the purpose of inter-personal communication. Speakers (or writers) try to convey a message, instill an idea or make an impression on the listeners. Listeners (or readers), in turn, are affected by the message and may respond to it. Language, in that sense, is an important vehicle that shapes (and is shaped by) social dynamics.

Traditional NLP research, however, focuses on ?documents? (either of full length or on the sentence level), rather than on the communication process as reflected by language use. Common examples of traditional NLP research are parsing, document classification, machine translation, and sentiment analysis at the sentence and document level without considering the social dynamics of the people who are writing and reading those texts.

In this workshop we move beyond analyzing the informational aspect of documents and discuss ways in which NLP can contribute to gaining insights about the interplay between language use and various levels of social dynamics.

The first Workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics is aiming at bringing together researchers from various disciplines such as computational linguistics, web science, sociology and digital humanities to demonstrate and discuss the potential of the state-of-the-art NLP algorithms applied to social and historical data.

The workshop will will feature long and short presentations and a panel discussion of critical issues at the intersection of computational linguistics and social science.

TOPICS

- Demographics, identity making, and psychological view of social media language

- Emergence and diffusion of slang and neologisms

- Emergence of metaphors

- Emotion dynamics in social media conversation threads

- Evolution of word formation and word meaning

- Language coordination and lexical entrainment

- Language evolution through history

- Language variation across communities

- Linguistic (phonological, morphological, etc) factors in word formation

- Linguistic and social factors in acceptance of new words and phrases

- Linguistic factors in information diffusion and information cascades.

- NLP techniques for analyzing social media

- Online (social) news outlets and public opinion

- Persuasive language and (online) campaigns

- Pragmatics of language

- Social dynamics in (blog/news story) comment threads

- Social relationships and language use

- Sociolinguistic perspective of social media language use

IMPORTANT DATES

- Submission deadline (long & short papers): March 21, 2014

- Author notification: April 11, 2014

- Camera ready: April 28, 2014

- Workshop: June 27, 2014

ORGANIZERS

Alice Oh KAIST, currently visiting Harvard University

Oren Tsur Harvard University, Northeastern University

-- Oren http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~orentsur/ -------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: text/html Size: 17145 bytes Desc: not available URL: <https://mailman.uib.no/public/corpora/attachments/20140307/d55ea04d/attachment.txt>

------------------------------

Message: 5 Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2014 10:06:27 -0500 From: Oren Tsur <orentsur at seas.harvard.edu> Subject: [Corpora-List] (deadline: March 21) 3rd CfP: ACL workshop on

NLP and Social Dynamics To: <corpora at uib.no>

====================================================================

====================================================================

3rd CfP: ACL workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics

Apologies for multiple postings

Please distribute to colleagues

=================================================================

3rd Call for Papers

1st workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics, collocated with ACL 2014, Baltimore, USA WS date: June 27, 2014 *Submission deadline: March 21, 2014*

Details: https://sites.google.com/site/orentsur/acl-workshop-on-nlp-and-social-dynamics

Confirmed panelists: Hanna Wallach (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Jacob Eisenstein (Georgia Tech), and Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil ( Max Plank Institute SWS)

=================================================================

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:

Language is a set of publicly agreed conventions that serves the purpose of inter-personal communication. Speakers (or writers) try to convey a message, instill an idea or make an impression on the listeners. Listeners (or readers), in turn, are affected by the message and may respond to it. Language, in that sense, is an important vehicle that shapes (and is shaped by) social dynamics.

Traditional NLP research, however, focuses on ?documents? (either of full length or on the sentence level), rather than on the communication process as reflected by language use. Common examples of traditional NLP research are parsing, document classification, machine translation, and sentiment analysis at the sentence and document level without considering the social dynamics of the people who are writing and reading those texts.

In this workshop we move beyond analyzing the informational aspect of documents and discuss ways in which NLP can contribute to gaining insights about the interplay between language use and various levels of social dynamics.

The first Workshop on NLP and Social Dynamics is aiming at bringing together researchers from various disciplines such as computational linguistics, web science, sociology and digital humanities to demonstrate and discuss the potential of the state-of-the-art NLP algorithms applied to social and historical data.

The workshop will will feature long and short presentations and a panel discussion of critical issues at the intersection of computational linguistics and social science.

TOPICS

- Demographics, identity making, and psychological view of social media language

- Emergence and diffusion of slang and neologisms

- Emergence of metaphors

- Emotion dynamics in social media conversation threads

- Evolution of word formation and word meaning

- Language coordination and lexical entrainment

- Language evolution through history

- Language variation across communities

- Linguistic (phonological, morphological, etc) factors in word formation

- Linguistic and social factors in acceptance of new words and phrases

- Linguistic factors in information diffusion and information cascades.

- NLP techniques for analyzing social media

- Online (social) news outlets and public opinion

- Persuasive language and (online) campaigns

- Pragmatics of language

- Social dynamics in (blog/news story) comment threads

- Social relationships and language use

- Sociolinguistic perspective of social media language use

IMPORTANT DATES

- Submission deadline (long & short papers): March 21, 2014

- Author notification: April 11, 2014

- Camera ready: April 28, 2014

- Workshop: June 27, 2014

ORGANIZERS

Alice Oh KAIST, currently visiting Harvard University

Oren Tsur Harvard University, Northeastern University

-- Oren http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~orentsur/ -------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: text/html Size: 17172 bytes Desc: not available URL: <https://mailman.uib.no/public/corpora/attachments/20140307/39379c24/attachment.txt>

------------------------------

Message: 6 Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2014 22:35:01 +0100 From: Roser Morante <roser.morante at uantwerpen.be> Subject: [Corpora-List] CoNLL 2014 Last Call for Papers To: undisclosed-recipients:;

(Apologies for cross-posting)

======================================================================

CoNLL-2014 Eighteenth Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning Baltimore, Maryland, USA June 26-27, 2014

http://www.conll.org/

====================================================================== Last Call for Papers ======================================================================

CoNLL is the yearly conference organized by SIGNLL (the ACL Special Interest Group on Natural Language Learning). This year, CoNLL will be collocated with ACL 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The shared task of CoNLL will be Grammatical Error Correction, see details below.

Important Dates ---------------

* Paper submission deadline: March 14, 2014, 23:59 EST (GMT-6)

* Notification of acceptance: April 21, 2014

* Camera-ready copy deadline: May 4, 2014

* Conference: June 26-27, 2014 (straight after ACL 2014)

Topics ------

CoNLL is an international conference for research on natural language learning. We invite the submission of papers on all aspects of computational approaches to natural language learning, including, but not limited to:

* Development and empirical evaluation of machine learning methods applied to any natural language or speech processing task in supervised, semi-supervised or unsupervised settings (e.g. structured prediction, graphical models, deep learning, relational learning, reinforcement learning, etc.).

* Theoretical analyses of learning-based approaches to natural language processing.

* Computational models of human language acquisition, language evolution and language change.

Special Topic of Interest: Machine Reading ------------------------------------

For this edition of CoNLL, we particularly solicit papers that focus on machine reading, "the automatic, unsupervised understanding of text" (Etzioni et al. 2006), which involves processes such as text analysis, knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, learning, inference, optimization, reasoning, and information fusion. The field is evolving rapidly thanks to the research performed in projects such as TextRunner (Banko, Cafarella, and Etzioni 2007), the Watson system of IBM (Ferrucci et al. 2010), ReVerb (Fader et al 2011), or NELL (Mitchel 2010) and the DARPA Machine Reading program (Strassel et al. 2010). We solicit papers related to all aspects of Machine Reading with special interest in papers that report research on inference.

Invited speakers ---------------

We are pleased to announce that Prof. Tom Mitchell (Carnegie Mellon University) and Prof. Morten H. Christiansen (Cornell University) have accepted to be invited speakers at CoNLL-2014.

Best Paper Award ----------------

As in recent CoNLL conferences, we are delighted to announce that Microsoft and Google will sponsor a Best Paper Award for the authors of the highest quality paper. The most important aspects in judging the quality of a paper will be: originality, innovativeness, relevance, and impact of the presented research.

Main Session Submission Details -------------------------------

A paper submitted to CoNLL-2014 must describe original, unpublished work. Submit a full paper by March 14, 2014, 23:59 EST (GMT-6). Papers may have up to eight (8) pages of content, with two (2) additional pages of references, and will be presented orally or as a poster presentation as determined by the program committee. The decisions as to which papers will be presented orally and which as poster presentations will be based on the nature rather than on the quality of the work. There will be no distinction in the proceedings between full papers presented orally and those presented as poster presentations.

We require the use of the ACL 2014 LaTeX style files or Microsoft Word Style files tailored for this year's conference. Papers must conform to the official ACL 2014 style guidelines. Authors who are unable to use these style files or submit a PDF file electronically should contact the program co-chairs. Submissions can be made via the following link:

https://www.softconf.com/acl2014/CoNLL2014

Authors may also optionally submit a second document containing supporting information such as proofs or algorithmic details. Reviewers will have access to the supporting information and may refer to it at their discretion. Any information that is critical to understanding the paper should be included within the paper itself.

Since reviewing will be blind, the paper should not include the authors' names and affiliations, and there should be no self-references that reveal the authors' identity. In the submission form, you will be asked for the following information: paper title, authors' names, affiliations, and email addresses, contact author's email address, a list of keywords, abstract of no more than 300 words, and information on whether the paper has been or will be simultaneously submitted to other conferences (and if so which conferences). The contact author of an accepted paper under multiple submission will need to promptly inform the program co-chairs whether he or she intends the accepted paper to appear in CoNLL-2014. A paper that is submitted to be included in CoNLL-2014 must be withdrawn from other conferences.

Authors of accepted submissions are to produce a final paper to be published in the proceedings of the conference, which will be available at the conference for participants, and distributed afterwards by ACL. Final papers must also follow the ACL 2014 style and should have at most 8 pages of content plus at most 2 extra pages for references only. At least one author must register for the conference and present the paper. Please do not submit a paper if you do not plan to attend the conference.

As in previous years, CoNLL-2014 will include a shared task which is organized by a separate committee. The details of the shared task are included in this CFP (see below). Please note the different submission details and deadlines for the shared task.

Conference Chairs -----------------

Roser Morante CLiPS University of Antwerp

Scott Wen-tau Yih Microsoft Research

Contact email: conll2014 at conll.org

Shared Task: Grammatical Error Correction -----------------------------------------

CoNLL 2014 will continue the CoNLL tradition of having a high profile shared task in natural language processing. This year's shared task will be grammatical error correction, a continuation of the CoNLL shared task in 2013. A participating system in this shared task is given short English essays written by non-native speakers of English. The system detects the grammatical errors present in the input essays, and returns the corrected essays. The shared task in 2014 will require a participating system to correct all errors present in an essay (i.e., not restricted to just the five error types required in 2013). The organization of the CoNLL 2014 shared task will be led by Hwee Tou Ng at the National University of Singapore.

Important Dates ---------------

November 22, 2013: announcement of shared task December 5, 2013: set up of shared task website December 27, 2013: registration begins and release of training set and scorer January 22, 2014: registration deadline March 16, 2014: test set available March 19, 2014: systems' outputs collected March 26, 2014: system results due to participants April 2, 2014: shared task system papers due April 11, 2014: reviews due April 14, 2014: notification of acceptance April 21, 2014: camera ready version of shared task system papers due June 26-27, 2014: CoNLL-2014 conference (Baltimore, Maryland, USA)

Contact -------

Questions about the CoNLL 2014 shared task can be sent to conll14st at gmail.com.

SIGNLL ------

See http://www.signll.org and http://www.signll.org/conll for more information about SIGNLL and CoNLL.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- Send Corpora mailing list submissions to

corpora at uib.no

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

http://mailman.uib.no/listinfo/corpora or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

corpora-request at uib.no

You can reach the person managing the list at

corpora-owner at uib.no

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of Corpora digest..."

_______________________________________________ Corpora mailing list Corpora at uib.no http://mailman.uib.no/listinfo/corpora

End of Corpora Digest, Vol 81, Issue 14 ***************************************



More information about the Corpora mailing list