[Corpora-List] American and British English spelling converter

Seth Grimes grimes at altaplana.com
Wed Nov 8 23:36:01 CET 2006


You're worried about '"seems a nice guy"' versus '"seems like a nice
guy".'

Well the two usages, American and British English, share the silly,
useless have-got duplicative redundancy*:

"I have got to stop needlessly using redundant words."

rather than

"You have to place the period inside the quotation marks." +

Seth

* That was a joke.
+ That was teasing.


On Wed, 8 Nov 2006, Merle Tenney wrote:


> Yup. Your students are more tuned to American usage on this point.

> BrE: "seems a nice guy"; AmE "seems like a nice guy".

>

> And we have BrE "stop someone doing something" against AmE "stop someone from doing something".

>

> And we have different operator treatments of the non-perfective have:

> BrE "I haven't the time"; AmE "I don't have the time".

>

> And . . . .

> And . . . .

> And . . . .

> And . . . .

> And . . . .

> And . . . .

>

>

> From: Linda Bawcom [mailto:linda.bawcom at sbcglobal.net]

> Sent: Tuesday, November 7, 2006 5:17 PM

> To: Merle Tenney; Harold Somers; CORPORA at UIB.NO

> Subject: RE: [Corpora-List] American and British English spelling converter

>

> By coincidence regarding this thread, just yesterday I gave an example to my Houstonian university students regarding subject complements [predicative complements] from the textbook I'm using called A Student's Introduction to Grammar by Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey Pullum. The example was:

>

> He seemed a very nice guy.

>

> As a Yank who got her MSc and is working on her doctorate in England, I hadn't thought much of it. However, my students took immediate exception. "It's wrong. It should be 'He seemed like a very nice guy' ", they said.

>

> Well, I don't want to belabor/belabour the point. Just thought I'd add my two cents/pence.

> Kindest regards,

> Linda Bawcom

>

> Merle Tenney <merlet at microsoft.com> wrote:

> You're right, Harry, the lexical and idiomatic differences between British and American English variants are better known than the grammatical differences. And the grammatical differences extend far beyond the singular and plural uses of collective nouns (American 'the government is' vs. British 'the government is' and 'the government are', depending). They also include:

>

> - Definiteness of generic references: 'go to hospital' BrE vs. 'go to the hospital' AmE

> - Inflected and periphrastic comparatives: 'commoner' BrE vs. 'more common' AmE

>

> And I am sure there are others.

>

> Merle

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: owner-corpora at lists.uib.no [mailto:owner-corpora at lists.uib.no] On Behalf Of Harold Somers

> Sent: Friday, November 3, 2006 2:47 AM

> To: CORPORA at UIB.NO

> Subject: RE: [Corpora-List] American and British English spelling converter

>

> It would be a grave mistake to think that the only difference between

> British and American English is a few wayward spellings. There are

> considerable and extensive lexical, grammatical and idiomatic

> differences. The 1st and 3rd of those are more or less well known, but

> the grammatical differences never cease to surprise me. I'd be

> moderately interested to see what other examples corpora listers come up

> with (though no doubt they will also remind me that there are

> significant differences in usage between American dialects, not to

> mention Canadian etc)

>

> To give just one example of each:

>

> Lift vs elevator

> Have you got vs do you have

> Half four vs 4:30

>

> Harold Somers

>

> > -----Original Message-----

> > >

> > > Martin Krallinger wrote:

> > >

> > >> Dear all,

> > >>

> > >> I was looking for some simple tool (preferable in Python) which is

> > >> able to do automatic conversion of texts (or words) from British

> > >> English (UK) to American (US) English and vice versa.

> > >> (Example: realize <-> realise)

> > >>

> > >> This seems to be an easy task, but I could not find any

> > ready to use

> > >> stand alone tool capable of performing this task.

> > >>

> > >> I want to integrate this application into an Information

> > extraction

> > >> system which handles scientific literature.

> > >>

> > >> I am also interested in references where aspects related to US/UK

> > >> English spelling has been analyzed in the context of information

> > >> extraction, text mining and terminology extraction.

> > >>

> > >> Best regards,

> > >>

> > >>

> > >> Martin

> > >>

> > >>

> > >

> > >

>

>

>

> "Any man's death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind." John Donne

>


--
Seth Grimes Alta Plana Corp, analytical computing & data management
Intelligent Enterprise magazine (CMP), Contributing Editor
grimes at altaplana.com http://altaplana.com 301-270-0795





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